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CHIPS FOR CHANGE

Chips for Change is inviting pet owners to pay what they can afford for a pet’s microchip: the suggested donation of $5, or a little extra, or help cover the cost of the microchip for a pet-owner in need (a total cost up to $25 per pet). 

Please note: Appointments to have the microchip implanted at one of the 3 Care First Animal Hospitals (free of charge) must be made by June 30, 2019.  Please note, each pet should be current on their rabies vaccine, please bring a copy of each pet’s rabies certificate. If a pet becomes unmanageable, fractious, or too aggressive, the microchip implantation process will need to readdress for the safety of the veterinary team.

Losing your pet is one of the most upsetting and stressful experiences for any pet owner. Yet thousands of North Carolina pets are lost each year and never reunited with their families due to a lack of identification. Many end up in overcrowded animal shelters and face euthanasia. A microchip can change this.  Pets that have microchips have a far greater chance of being found by their owners.

That’s why the SPCA of Wake County and Care First Animal Hospitals are teaming up to change the future of lost pets in our community. This collaborative partnership will help change the fate of the community’s lost pets by removing the financial barrier of microchipping faced by some pet owners.

“Losing your dog or cat is one of the most upsetting and stressful experiences for any pet owner,” explains Dr. Joe Gordon, founder, and veterinarian of Care First Animal Hospital. This collaborative partnership will change the fate of the community’s lost pets by removing the financial barrier for pet owners thinking about purchasing a microchip.

“A microchip ensures that a pet and his or her owners can be quickly reunited,” Dr. Gordon continues. “It is a method of pet identification that can be more reliable than a tag on a collar which pets can easily lose.”

FAQs:

  • What is a microchip?
    A microchip is a small device about the size of a grain of rice. It is inserted under a pet’s skin. Each microchip has a special identification number that when registered, is linked to your pet. That ID number allows the registry company to retrieve your contact information so you can be reunited with your pet. A microchip is not a GPS device, and can not track your pet’s location. 
  • Does it hurt my pet?
    Receiving a microchip is similar to a pet receive routine shots for vaccinations.
  • Why Should I microchip my pet?
    ID tags and collars are usually the fastest way for pets and pet owners to be reunited. But they aren’t always reliable. Collars and tags can easily come off if a pet is scared and running loose or if your pet doesn’t wear a collar in the house and slips out an open door, a microchip can literally save the day!